What was the “breath of life” that Adam and Eve received?

God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. (Genesis 1:27)

In Genesis 1:27 the Hebrew word for “created” is bara’.  Bara’ is only used three times in Genesis chapter 1.  An act of bara’ creation is supernatural, it occurs when God creates something out of nothing, something brand new, something that has never existed before.

Making the physical bodies of Adam and Eve was an act of asah creation; He made their bodies with pre-existing materials:  the matter, the elements, He had bara’ created in verse 1.

So, what was the act of bara’creation in verse 27?  Genesis 2 sheds some light on the matter.

Then the LORD God formed man of dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being. (Genesis 2:7)

God bara’ created Adam and Eve to contain the breath of life.  And what does the original Hebrew language reveal about the breath of life?  Well, I am no Hebrew scholar, but my pastor is, and he has carefully studied the book of Genesis in its original language.

When God created Adam and Eve, He created them in His image, but He created them to be spiritually alive.  He breathed within them the breath of life, and they became a living being.  The construction for those words “the breath of life” is the Nishmat chaim; which is a specific construction for the very Holy Spirit of God. (Aaron Budjen; November 16, 2008; By Grace Fellowship)

Apparently, this is a controversial issue.  Perhaps it is because many Christians have not been introduced to the concept.  The quote above is by Aaron Budjen, and I am writing this blog to introduce you to him, a fellow brother, a friend of my family, and our pastor.

Aaron is a well-known expert in Hebrew grammar throughout Orthodox Jewish Synagogues from CA to NY, he was a teacher of Hebrew for seven years, and a consultant to professors of Biblical Hebrew.  Aaron got saved while studying to become a Rabbi, and is the pastor of By Grace Fellowship in Denver, CO.  Aaron is also the founder of the radio broadcast ministry, Living God Ministries, and can be heard on AM radio across the USA.

Again, I don’t want you to take my word for it; so please listen to Aaron.  In the following portion of a message he gave at By Grace Fellowship (transcribed from an audio recording), Aaron explains the correct meaning of the “breath of life.”

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Aaron Budjen/ November 16, 2008 / Colossians 1:18-22 / Published by Restoration Bible Fellowship

Colossians chapter 1 verse 18, “And He is the head of the body, the church, who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in all things He may have the preeminence.”

The Lord Jesus is the firstborn from the dead. The people in this world are the dead. All right? He is the firstborn from among the dead.

When a person is born into this world they are born spiritually dead; that’s the important thing to understand.  When a person is born in the flesh – they are born of their mother and out of their mother’s womb – they are born dead; they are not born alive.

When you look at them you think, “Gosh, there seems to be a lot of life in them.  They’re crying; they need their diapers changed; they need a bottle, stuff like that,” and you think, “Well, gosh, they seem to be perfectly alive to me?” And in that sense, they certainly are; they are very much physically alive, but they are spiritually dead. And what that means is that they do not have life. 

A basic definition of death is the absence of life.  When somebody dies you don’t check to see if you have the presence of death, you check to see if you have the absence of life.  If there is no indication that a person is alive, then they’re dead, and you pronounce them to be so.

So likewise, when we are born into this world we are born without life, and the life that we do not have is the very life of our God.  We do not have Him indwelling within us; His Spirit indwelling within us which is the very life of God.  In other words, we were created for the sole purpose of having the presence of our Creator indwelling within us, and that was expressed as having the life of God indwelling within you.  That’s how we were created.

When God created Adam and Eve, He created them in His image, but He created them to be spiritually alive.  He breathed within them the breath of life, and they became a living being.  The construction for those words “the breath of life” is the Nishmat chaim*; which is a specific construction for the very Holy Spirit of God.

When you keep reading there is a similar passage that talks about the breath of life that was breathed within animals, but it isa different construction, it’s just ever so subtle, but it’s different enough to be able to distinguish between the pneumatic life, from a Greek point of view – that which gives a person the ability to walk and talk and breath – from the spiritual life which is the very life of the indwelling Creator.  When He gave the commandment that in the day that you eat from the wrong tree you will die, He was referring to the life that He had breathed within them that they would lose.

Now, if you don’t understand this, you might as well just pack up and go.  It’s just over.  It really is.  You may believe that there is a God somewhere out there.  Fine.  You may have a new way of living.  That’s ok. But in terms of knowing your God, if you don’t understand the nature of the problem, then when the solution is presented it is not going to have any meaning at all.  And in terms of growth, and your life in Christ, it’s not going to mean anything because you’re still going to be dead.  Okay?

So understand that the original creation was such that God had breathed within Adam and Eve the breath of life, which was His very Spirit within them.  And then in accordance with the law of sin and death, when they violated the law and ate from the wrong tree, that life was withdrawn from within them and they became spiritually dead.  They were once spiritually alive, and then they became spiritually dead.  And all of those who had been born in Adam and Eve subsequently from that point were born spiritually dead in the image of Adam, not in the image of God.  That’s the bad news.

And it’s important to understand the bad news. It’s like mathematics, if you don’t understand that the question is 2+2 it’s not going to make much of a difference if you hear the word “four.”   I can go walking around saying “Four! Four!”  People are wondering, “What does that mean?  I don’t know that it’s the answer to 2+2.” Well, it’s the same thing when we go around saying, “Jesus is the answer!  Jesus is the answer!”  And people are wondering, “What’s the question?  The answer to what?”  And we say, “To everything!”  Well, that doesn’t mean anything.  These things have to be clearly defined, otherwise there’s going to be this gap that kind of exists, and people are just kind of floating around wondering what’s missing.

What is generally missing is just the fundamentals of the gospel.  Just to understand that we are born into this world spiritually dead.  The Lord Jesus forgave all of our sins, so that there is no sin being held against us.  That deals with the issue that caused death to begin with; it was sin that caused death:  the wages of sin is death.  He dealt with that.  But that doesn’t solve the problem.  I mean, that was an important problem, but the real problem was that we were spiritually dead.  We did not have His life indwelling within us.  So He rose from the dead so that He could offer to us the life that had been lost in Adam.  And that is the Holy Spirit; the Spirit of God is now being offered as a free gift, defined as “the life of God,” the free gift of life.  (end of quotation.)

* Note: I asked Aaron for the correct spelling of  “the breath of life” from Genesis 2:7; I had come up with Nĕshamah chay from blueletterbible.com.  Aaron replied,  “The best transliteration I can think of is, nishmat chaim.  What you found is a transliteration of the root words, not the derivations that you would read in the text.” (email, 10/29/15)

 

On trusting God . . . (and admitting that I don’t)

“The goal of the Christian life is to start trusting God,” according to Aaron Budjen.

He says this in opposition to the widely accepted belief that most Christians live by:  “The goal of the Christian life is to stop sinning.”

No, Aaron says, the goal is not to stop sinning.”  Why?  Because that is impossible.

But trusting God also seems an impossible task at times.  I gave this a lot of thought recently and realized that there was a contradiction between my claim of trusting God and all of the time I spend worrying.

If I actually trusted Him, why do I essentially say to Him:  “Hey God, let me tell you how you should run your universe.”

A few weeks ago I asked myself, “Wait.  Do I even trust God?”

I realized that the answer was no.  With certain things, no, I don’t trust Him.

I just lived with that for a few days.  (Ouch.)

Then, last week, I had an hour-long drive home with views of the Rocky Mountains and rolling hills and cascading pine forests along the way . . .

I thought to myself, “Wow, you’re an idiot!

With my heart rejoicing, I prayed, “Lord, of course I can trust You!  Look at all that you have created!!  Your power is amazing.”

Next, I had these two really vivid dream.  They happened over a span of two nights, and were the type of dream that you can never forget.  They were obvious reminders from God that He is trustworthy; they were reassurances of His friendship with me, His close involvement in my life.

It was as if God was saying, “It’s okay.  I understand.  You are just flesh and blood.  I know exactly how you feel.  But, you really can trust Me.”

And I was blown away!  Yes, I can most certainly trust Him!

I love it how He doesn’t condemn us or expect us to be perfect, or strong or heroically brave.  God is so kind and gentle with us.  He has no expectations of us; He has forgiven us of all of our sin and trespasses (Col 1:14, Eph 1:7).

He knows that we need His comfort, and He gives it to us in times of need.

In fact, He has given us everything that we need, because we have Him!  We just have to remember that He is trustworthy.  🙂

“His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own glory and excellence.” 2 Peter 1:3

Is there power in prayer? A Q&A by Aaron Budjen of Living God Ministries.

“I do not believe in the power of prayer. I only believe in the power of God.”

This article can be found here; it is posted at the Q&A section of Aaron’s website.

QUESTION:

I am preparing a sermon on prayer, and was wondering what your thoughts might be on the subject.

ANSWER:

As I see prayer expressed in Christianity today, I really believe there is a very fine line between prayer and witchcraft. In witchcraft, prayer is exercised as a means of getting spiritual entities to respond in a way to inflict good on some other person. Of course the witch determines what is good and what is evil, and either the overall spiritual consciousness or individual spirits respond to the prayer being invoked. The concept of believing in the power of prayer did not originate from the recent Christian mantras, but has been a fundamental tenant of witchcraft for many ages.

I do not believe in the power of prayer. I only believe in the power of God. Now, many Christians respond to me when I say this in agreement with me, but in their hearts they really don’t believe me. They truly believe that God is going to respond to them because of their prayers to Him, and hide their pride by saying something like, “if it’s the will of God.” However, deep down inside they really believe that they can have an influence on God, and that they now have some mystical power they can draw on to effectively inspire or even control the hand of God. While this is certainly very attractive to our flesh, prayer has nothing to do with getting God to respond to us.

God is so often portrayed in the same way that God is portrayed in witchcraft. He is some kind of impersonal spiritual essence that we call upon when life isn’t going the way we want it to go. Many Christians have no idea that God is a real person, who is actively living His life as we live ours. He inspires people, and communicates with them. He effects events and sometimes intervenes in miraculous ways in the affairs of mankind. But He decides when, how, and what He will do regardless of what we tell Him we would like Him to do. He does retain His autonomy and sovereignty quite often in spite of us.

Paul wrote in Philippians 4:6-7 that we are to be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God, and the peace of God, which surpasses all comprehension, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. It is a comfort to me when I experience anxiety that I can speak to God and He hears me. However, as my focus is turned towards Him, I recognize His love for me, and can experience a peace that can only come from Him. This is not because I think He is going to respond to me and give me what I want, but because I recognize who He is in the midst of my circumstances.

You can’t imagine how people are often offended when they ask me what they should be praying for me in my life, and I respond with the fact that I’m not particularly anxious about anything at the moment. It is so offensive because they personally are often consumed with their own anxiety, and they can’t pray anything for me to make themselves feel like they are concerned more about others than themselves. Don’t let such a comment stop you from praying for me, in fact, this may inspire you to pray for me more if you don’t agree with me, but let it be put on your heart by the Spirit of God within you to pray for me if He inspires you to do so. And if He inspires you to pray for me, I can’t imagine Him not also telling you what to pray for. Otherwise, prayer can easily become a mechanism and a religious excuse to stir up gossip.

In my own personal life experience, I have found my life of prayer to be more a time of expressing thanks than asking God for something. He has given me everything I need for life and godliness, 2 Pet 1:3. So, what can I ask for that I don’t already have? Generally what I don’t need for life and godliness. Should I really expect God to respond to that? Not necessarily. Don’t get me wrong. There are many occasions when I do pray and make requests that appear to be directly related to my flesh. The important thing to realize is that this does not have anything to do with my relationship with my God. So often people ask for Him to do what He never came to do, and reject that which He already gave. All that remains is the giving of thanks, which I do as I pray and live my life with a dependency on Him. Subsequently my prayer life becomes more an act of listening than of talking, wanting to hear from Him about what He has given me, and how it applies to my life.

Aaron Budjen