The Strong Emotions of King David

Was King David a Drama Queen?  Maybe he was . . . but, in a good way!  He was a wonderfully passionate man with really strong emotions.  And he was a man with a heart filled with so much faith, so much trust in God, that he is used as a type of Christ, a model for the Messiah:

“And I, the LORD, will be their God, and My servant David will be prince among them; I the LORD have spoken. (Ezekiel 34:24)

That is astounding!  David is used synonymously with the Messiah; this verse is a prophesy of the coming Messiah!

David was an ordinary human who became extraordinary because of his passionate reliance and dependency on the Lord His God.

Because of his faith, David was chosen to replace Saul as the King of Israel.  Because God recognized him as a “man after my own heart.”

“But now (Saul) your kingdom shall not endure. The LORD has sought out for Himself a man after His own heart, and the LORD has appointed him as ruler over His people…”    (1 Samuel 13:14)

Despite being one of the most famous men who has ever lived, and one of the most important Bible characters in the history of the world . . . to me, David is just my big brother in Christ.  He is someone who I look forward to meeting, and teasing, one day.

“Dude, you know that you were a total drama queen when you lived back on the old earth.  Right?  I mean, c’mon, you totally were.”

And he’ll reply, “Oh yeah!  Totally.”

(LOL.  . . .Well, who knows?  But I nonetheless entertain myself with such imaginings.)

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Okay, so you know those reading plans that give you daily assignments so that you can read through the Bible chronologically in one year?  Well, so far, it’s been five years and I’m in the book of Jeremiah.  I’m so slow because I often skip a day, or a week, or even a month.  Plus, I typically re-read my daily assignment; sometimes over and over for several weeks.  (Gotta be OCD with the Bible!)

Since I’m new to the “grace message,” to a complete understanding of the New Covenant, it seems like I am reading the Bible for the first time.  Even though I’ve been saved for 26 years.

Anyway, this slow and careful reading style allowed me to really get to know David.  And I fell in love with him while reading through his life story, and through all of his poetry.  When I came to his death in the book of 1 Kings, I started crying.  I remember exactly where I was sitting in my house when that happened.  I realized how much I would miss him.  I felt so sad that his life came to an end; it was like a good friend had left me.

I hope that one day on the new earth, he will come to regard me also as a good friend.  And I hope he will laugh when I tease him about being a drama queen.  Such mood swings; such melodramatic laments at times!  But maybe that’s what I love best about him, because his emotional outbursts were often channeled toward his praise of God. (Such as Psalm 103). When you read David’s Psalms, you see that David completely trusted in God.  He knew that God is good; that God is trustworthy; that God is kind.

Trust in Him at all times, O people;

Pour out your heart before Him;

God is a refuge for us.

(Psalm 62:8)

Of course, we all know that David was not a perfect person; his adultery with Bathsheba and the way he orchestrated the murder of her husband are notorious stories.  David fully acknowledged his own sinfulness; he was completely acquainted with his own depravity.  He didn’t try to hide it; he was a man who lived in reality.

But he pleased God because he had true faith.  His heart trusted completely in the Lord.  And God honors David’s faith throughout the Bible.  In Jeremiah, it is implied that the Messiah came because of David!  That is was for David that the Messiah is raised up!

“Behold, the days are coming,” declares the LORD, “When I will raise up for David a righteous Branch; And He will reign as king and act wisely And do justice and righteousness in the land.  (Jeremiah 23:5)

David did not get to live in the days of the New Covenant, in the days following the resurrection of the Righteous Branch.  As a result, there was so much that David did not understand, and perhaps that is what caused his mood swings.

“Take not thy Holy Spirit from me,” was spoken by a man who did not have the opportunity to be born again by the Holy Spirit.  Certainly, the Spirit “came upon” David at times, but not in an abiding, eternal way.

For us today, we know that the Holy Spirit will never leave us or forsake us.  It is because we are “raised up” with Jesus; we are resurrected from the dead, just as Jesus was.

Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. (Colossians 3:1)

David looked forward to the resurrection; we look back to it.  I think it’s at the Second Coming that the dead in Christ will rise first – so does that mean that David will be with us during the Millennial Reign of Christ?  I hope so!  But whatever happens, we know that David has a fantastic future ahead of him:  everlasting life with the God whom he loved and trusted in with all of his heart!

 

February 3, 2018

On trusting God . . . (and admitting that I don’t)

“The goal of the Christian life is to start trusting God,” according to Aaron Budjen.

He says this in opposition to the widely accepted belief that most Christians live by:  “The goal of the Christian life is to stop sinning.”

No, Aaron says, the goal is not to stop sinning.”  Why?  Because that is impossible.

But trusting God also seems an impossible task at times.  I gave this a lot of thought recently and realized that there was a contradiction between my claim of trusting God and all of the time I spend worrying.

If I actually trusted Him, why do I essentially say to Him:  “Hey God, let me tell you how you should run your universe.”

A few weeks ago I asked myself, “Wait.  Do I even trust God?”

I realized that the answer was no.  With certain things, no, I don’t trust Him.

I just lived with that for a few days.  (Ouch.)

Then, last week, I had an hour-long drive home with views of the Rocky Mountains and rolling hills and cascading pine forests along the way . . .

I thought to myself, “Wow, you’re an idiot!

With my heart rejoicing, I prayed, “Lord, of course I can trust You!  Look at all that you have created!!  Your power is amazing.”

Next, I had these two really vivid dream.  They happened over a span of two nights, and were the type of dream that you can never forget.  They were obvious reminders from God that He is trustworthy; they were reassurances of His friendship with me, His close involvement in my life.

It was as if God was saying, “It’s okay.  I understand.  You are just flesh and blood.  I know exactly how you feel.  But, you really can trust Me.”

And I was blown away!  Yes, I can most certainly trust Him!

I love it how He doesn’t condemn us or expect us to be perfect or strong or heroically brave.  God is so kind and gentle with us.  He has no expectations of us; He has forgiven us of all of our sin and trespasses (Col 1:14, Eph 1:7).

He knows that we need His comfort, and He gives it to us in times of need.

In fact, He has given us everything that we need, because we have Him!  We just have to remember that He is trustworthy.  🙂

“His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own glory and excellence.”  (2 Peter 1:3)

 

April 30, 2017

Can our Feelings be Dangerous?

Don’t fear your feelings.

Our feelings can be so strong that we are tempted to want to numb them.  We can be tempted to think that feelings are the enemy, that feelings are dangerous, that feelings must be overcome.

But shouldn’t feelings be felt?

An email I attempted to craft this morning left me feeling annoyed and depressed and despondent.  Why?  Because of the thoughts I had been struggling with that past hour.  My ‘bad’ feelings were simply a result of what I had been thinking.

Our feelings are simply the emotional response to what we think.  Feelings arise as a response to what we are thinking, and of course our thinking can be quite sinful and evil.  When your thinking goes awry, it is best to take the apostle Paul’s advice and give thanks in every circumstance, pray continually and rejoice always.

But, feelings.  They are simply emotions.  You can feel angry at your brother, or your mother or your spouse.  And what’s wrong with that?  Nothing.  Anger is a normal part of life.  Anger is not necessarily a problem.  But when your anger propels you to think about being violent – with either weapons or words – then that is a problem.  Acting on that thought would be a very serious problem.  Instead…

Take a deep breath, go for a jog, take a hot shower, whatever.  But, I’m not here today to talk about anger management.

I want to say this:  don’t be tempted to think that feelings are dangerous.  They are normal and natural and a wonderful part of our humanity.

Our feelings are a magnificent design feature created by our God.  When our feelings are ‘good,’ we experience pleasure.  When our feelings are ‘bad,’ we experience pain.  Don’t numb those bad feelings.  Let them run their course.  Experience them.  And talk to God about them.

It’s especially important to pray if you do not understand your feelings.  Ask God to help you.  Perhaps He will show you that your ‘bad’ feelings are the result of erroneous thinking or sinful desires.  But, maybe not.  Maybe your anger or depression is normal.

Thoughts can be false.  Feelings are a blessing.  They are a gift.

 

February 2, 2017