Christian Dream Interpretation — God drew me closer to Him through a dream — Part 3 of 3.

It’s been said a lot, but it is true:  “Christianity is not a religion; it’s a relationship.”  And it is because our God’s main concern is having a close relationship with us, it is for this reason, that He gave me “The Black Crows dream.”

 

In the dream I was looking up into the sky at a large white sail that was being carried by half a dozen crows.  As I continued to watch them fly away, I realized that they were not carrying a sail, but a robe.  It was my own white robe that the crows were taking away from me.  I looked on, bothered by this fact, and meanwhile I was chewing a piece of raw meat.  I just stood there, watching and chewing.  I was not able to swallow the meat; I found it to be inedible.

 

Upon waking, I deduced that since the crows had taken my “robe of righteousness” (Isaiah 61:10) it must be that God was clarifying His disappointment with me, and telling me that I had become unrighteous.

 

During this time, I was listening to the “Spiritual Warfare” series produced by Living God Ministries, and thanks to the truth presented through these messages, God began to show me that the dream was actually a really clever way of teaching me about Law versus Grace, the lie versus the truth.

 

God saw that I was in danger of believing the devil’s lie, so he chose to “wake me up” through a dream.

 

He used this dream to show me what NOT to believe; to reject the lie that my sin makes me unrighteous. . . . Because believing that lie prevents me from being able to eat “the meat” of the Scriptures.

 

God is amazing!  And so personal!  He knew exactly what I needed to hear.

 

The interpretation that God gave me is this:

 

Satan is a liar who wants me to believe that I can lose my righteousness.  The devil condemns me, accuses me, and gets me to think that my inability to overcome certain sins makes me unworthy and unholy.  Satan wants me to believe that he has the legal right to remove my ‘robe of righteousness’ (he uses his minions, his demons, represented by the crows, to accomplish this task.)  And as long as I believe the devil’s lies, I cannot swallow the meat of the Scripture.  I will not grow in grace and in the knowledge of Jesus Christ.  My Christian life will be stunted and stagnant, as I remain a baby, one who can only drink milk.

 

I then memorialized what He taught me by writing this poem in my journal:

 

The black crows carried an ivory sheet,

Five birds flying with a large white sail.

But on second look, it was a cloak.

A robe.  A symbol of my righteousness.

 

They were stealing it, taking it, flying away.

But it was not theirs to take.

I was watching it happen while eating the meat

that had become inedible.

 

The theft was induced,

By iniquity and shame.

The theft was produced,

And I granted their gain.

 

My enemy is skilled with thievery and lies,

I doubted not the black crows’ rights.

Yet robbers they were.  I began to see,

That the white cloak remained on me.

 

 

Our God wants to have a close relationship with us, and He wants us to trust in the fact that He has completely forgiven us of all our sins – our transgressions have been removed as far as the east is from the west.

 

The images in dreams are often symbols or types, so if you think He has given you a dream, ask Him for the interpretation, and He just may tell you what all the symbols mean!

 

For me, the meaning of the dream was all about His acceptance of me.  He not only loves me, but He accepts me and relates to me in the midst of my sinful condition.  . . . Because of the fact that Jesus finished the work 2,000 years ago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Life

woman walking on pathway while strolling luggage
Photo by VisionPic .net on Pexels.com

 

I was pretty shocked when I began to hear the Lord speak quietly to my heart that it was time to quit church.  “Not so, Lord,” I said, in the spirit of Peter from Acts 10 and 11.

 

But I finally relented.  . . . Although it seemed as though I was having an inner temper tantrum in my “obedience” to my Lord and Master, Jesus the Messiah.  (Good job, Lisa.)

 

The following Sunday, it was a huge surprise to me when Jesus made Himself known.  His presence was manifested to me. “Oh!!  Jesus!”  I said.  “Well, hello there!  It’s been so long!”  And His glorious joy was poured out to my spirit.

 

Of course He had never left me nor forsaken me.  But I had forsaken Him.  For 15 years.  Why?  Well, heck, I was trying to be a “good Christian.”

 

Before quitting church, the Lord had been stripping me of a belief system that was based on rules and regulations.  I was all about, “you have to do this, and you shouldn’t do that.”

 

He led me to quit church in 2004, and by 2006 the only ‘law’ I was still holding on to tenaciously was that we  “have to ask forgiveness for our sins.”  Finally, the Lord gently removed that one last requirement through learning the proper meaning of 1 John 1:8&9.  Simply put, John was speaking to unbelievers (most likely the Gnostics in his audience) in verses 8 and 9 of chapter 1.

 

So, I came to understand that I did not have to ask for forgiveness; that His death on the cross had already accomplished my forgiveness, and I simply had to believe that “it is finished.”

 

Realizing that I no longer had a Christian To-Do List, there was simply nothing left for me to do.  Except to love Him back.  To trust Him.  To rely on Him.  To depend on Him.  I began to live my life in a totally different way.  I trusted Him to lead me and guide me.

 

The way I parented our three kids became completely different; the way I viewed God began to line up with reality; I began to give my husband grace, and stopped trying to change him into a repentant and obedient ‘godly man.’  The TREE OF LIFE became my daily food; I had left behind the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.  I now live every day with Jesus, worshiping Him in spirit and in truth.  It’s a glorious life.

 

And if you’re wondering, no, I don’t go to “church.”  Well, I never went back to “formalized” church.  Yet to this day, I do gather together with believers on a regular basis, and there is more true fellowship in my life now than there ever was in the days when I went to church four times a week

Must faith be accompanied by works?

Forgive me, Father, I have sinned; it has been four months since my last blog post.

Just kidding!  . . . About the asking for forgiveness part.  Not kidding that it’s been four months since I’ve written anything here.  My personal life has been overwhelming and consuming and causing much anxiety — a ‘down-cast heart.’  I have simply not had the energy to blog.

But God is active and living and He is ever-present, dwelling in my innermost being, as I live through the storms of life.  Though the world may slay me, yet will I praise Him.

So, getting to the point, must faith be accompanied by works?  . . . Of course not!  We are saved by grace through faith, and we are sustained each and every day by His grace through our faith; through our trust in Him; our resting in the work He has already accomplished.

But what about the book of James?

But are you willing to recognize, you foolish fellow, that faith without works is useless? (James 2:20, NASB)

Gee, thanks for the encouragement, brother James.

No, sorry.  He got that part wrong.  Faith is IT.  Sola fide.  We are justified by faith alone.

The five chapters of the book of James are filled with things we must do.  There is not one mention of the death or resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ.  No mention of the divinity of Jesus.  No mention of our forgiveness or justification by faith.  James believes we are justified by works.

You see that a man is justified by works and not by faith alone. (James 2:24, NASB)

Did you know that the book of James was ABSENT from the first list of New Testament books known as the Muratorian Fragment.  James’ epistle was not confirmed as a book of the Bible, included in the canon of the New Testament, until the fourth century A.D.!  James was added to the Bible in AD 367, after the creation of Roman Catholicism!

Yet there is an excellent argument to be made concerning the fact that including the book of James in the Bible is important because it illustrates the differences between Paul and James, between a life of faith and a life of works. (Click here for a Bible Study by Living God Ministries on that topic.)

Sure James makes some good points, such as “if you stumble at one part of the Law of Moses, you are guilty of the entire thing.”  But, mainly, when I read the book of James, I think, “Man, he’s a raging legalist!”

I’m thankful that I have been set free from a life of works.  I am thankful to live a life of freedom in Christ Jesus; a life where I am free to walk in the Spirit, and live each day according to the Law of the Spirit of Life, and not according to the Law of Sin and death.

 

 

November 6, 2019  9:58 AM